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Vaccines will handle ‘all viral flavours’, early evidence suggests

Vaccines will handle ‘all viral flavours’, early evidence suggests

Preliminary evidence suggests vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna will provide slightly-weaker-but-effective coverage against new variants of COVID-19.

  • by Liam Mannix

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What do sharks want – and why do they bite?
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Sharks

What do sharks want – and why do they bite?

Last year was the deadliest for shark attacks since 1929. Why? And what do we really know about the secret lives of sharks?

  • by Sherryn Groch
How spitting cobra venom evolved to be a ‘defensive chemical weapon’

How spitting cobra venom evolved to be a ‘defensive chemical weapon’

New research has found the venom from spitting cobras is supercharged to cause as much pain as possible.

  • by Stuart Layt
Ancient food scraps prove northern Australia is now the driest it’s ever been

Ancient food scraps prove northern Australia is now the driest it’s ever been

UQ researchers have analysed 65,000 years of food scraps at a site in Kakadu national park which shows the area is the driest it has even been in human history.

  • by Stuart Layt
Dust and snowflakes add up to gongs for standout scientists

Dust and snowflakes add up to gongs for standout scientists

Two brilliant minds have been honoured for exploring the hidden beauty of mathematics and making a string of crucial contributions to the space race.

  • by Liam Mannix
Trial begins to solve complicated treatment problem for child cancer

Trial begins to solve complicated treatment problem for child cancer

A trial is now under way that researchers hope will prove the effectiveness of a new method to remove serious side-effects from a cancer treatment for children.

  • by Stuart Layt
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As more countries impose COVID-19 curfews, scientists ask: Do they work?

As more countries impose COVID-19 curfews, scientists ask: Do they work?

While curfews make intuitive sense, it’s very hard to discern their precise effects on viral transmission. Scientists wonder if they might even increase the spread of the coronavirus.

  • by Gina Kolata
National stockpile masks deemed 'defective' by medical watchdog

National stockpile masks deemed 'defective' by medical watchdog

Safety experts have called for an overhaul of Australia’s 'trust-based' mask regulations after hundreds of masks had their registration pulled following a government review.

  • by Liam Mannix
Is Novavax the dark horse of Australia's COVID-19 vaccines?

Is Novavax the dark horse of Australia's COVID-19 vaccines?

Manufacturing and trial delays have meant Australia’s third vaccine has slipped off the radar – but early trial data raises hopes it could offer strong protection against and even halt the virus' spread.

  • by Liam Mannix and Emma Koehn
How pandemic proved the 'bin chicken' doesn't need humans for a feed

How pandemic proved the 'bin chicken' doesn't need humans for a feed

Ibises did not suffer during pandemic lockdowns because they never relied on humans for their main source of food, an expert says.

  • by Stuart Layt
Egypt unveils 3000-year old coffins in latest archaeological discovery

Egypt unveils 3000-year old coffins in latest archaeological discovery

The find, 3000 to 4000 years old, includes coffins and mummies, the funerary temple of Queen Nearit and a four-metre long papyrus that contains texts of the Book of the Dead.