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Annalise McKewen from Gilroy College, Baulkham Hills hopes to get an early offer to university.

Early uni offers to target students disadvantaged by COVID-19

Universities are for the first time offering students early entry based on their year 11 work from this year.

  • by Anna Patty

Latest

School systems are facing greater funding transparency requirements.
Education

Catholic school systems to face more funding transparency

Non-government school authorities will be forced to provide more information about how they distribute public funding between their schools.

  • by Fergus Hunter
A Fairfax spokesman said there were "no plans to change from daily printing and we expect that to be the case for some years into the future."
Education

Just one in five students learning media literacy, as news consumption rises

New research shows 88 per cent of young Australians were consuming news this year, propelled by the Australian bushfire season and coronavirus pandemic.

  • by Natassia Chrysanthos
Vaccine researcher Professor Jamie Triccas has helped design the new course.
Exclusive
University

Students to study COVID-19 in real-time with new uni course

Science graduates will be trained to fight both today's pandemic and any future outbreaks with a new short course.

  • by Natassia Chrysanthos
China campaign: senior leaders of the University of NSW pose with signs saying "Australia welcomes you".
Exclusive
Pacific diplomacy

'Australia welcomes you': Business, universities launch China damage control campaign

The campaign is a sign of how seriously local interests are taking the risk to Australia's image in China posed by tensions over the coronavirus, geopolitics and racism.

  • by Michael Koziol
The curriculum review was described as a "back to basics" approach
Teaching

Will curriculum reform take students back to basics, or prepare them for the future?

Reactions to the NSW curriculum review have been divided, but all agree the hard part will be making it work.

  • by Jordan Baker
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Year 11 and 12 students return to Mount Alexander College.
Opinion
Opinion

An idea we should import from the UK to help students catch up

The Morrison government will be spending billions of dollars over the next 6-to-12 months to kick-start the economy. A small fraction of that new federal spending – less than 1 per cent – should be spent on tutoring in schools.

  • by Julie Sonnemann
The optional test gives teachers an insight in lieu of NAPLAN.
Schools

New progress check for years 5, 9 hailed as 'enlightened' test

In the absence of NAPLAN, schools can now choose whether their year 5 and 9 students will sit an online test to check their progress.

  • by Jordan Baker
Ramsay Scholarships will cover the cost of postgraduate degrees at institutions such as Harvard
University

From Rhodes to Ramsay: Western Civilisation centre offers lucrative scholarships

The Ramsay Centre for Western Civilisation is offering Rhodes-style scholarships for postgraduate students to study overseas

  • by Jordan Baker
One lesson from the remote schooling experience has been that students are clearly able to be more independent in their learning.
Opinion
Opinion

Schools interrupted, have learnt valuable lessons

The last 12 weeks have seen the most significant disruption to our education system in living memory. We can't go back to business as usual.

  • by Marise McConaghy
Pupils from Newtown High School  took their 'Apple' computer to the Newtown Senior Citizens Centre, to show the residents some of the new technology used to teach in schools today.
Education

From the Archives: Call for computers in high schools

Forty years ago, high school principals called for the provision of computers for every high school in Australia. It paved the way for the use of technology in education that has continued unabated.

  • by Christopher Henning
Moving in lockstep with their classmates can be boring for gifted kids.
Opinion
Opinion

Some of our brightest still slipping under the radar

Graduate teachers are still walking into classrooms with little to no training in gifted education, and are rarely receiving support or guidance from above.

  • by Brooke Lumsden
School students on an excursion, generic school, private schools, student, girls, education. Thursday 23 November 2006 AFR photo Louie Douvis   AFR FIRST USE ONLY SPECIALX 58822
Schools

Growth in money for private school students outstrips public schools

Income for each NSW public school student increased by $583 between 2009 and 2018, compared with $2520 per student at independent schools.

  • by Natassia Chrysanthos and Adam Carey
Nationals minister Andrew Gee (centre) has warned his party will need assurances before supporting the proposed university overhaul.
Exclusive
Regional Australia

Nationals issue warning on government's university funding overhaul

Frontbencher Andrew Gee says the junior Coalition partner will only support the proposed shake-up after addressing any concerns held by regional universities.

  • by Fergus Hunter
Too many students drop out before graduation.
Letters
Opinion

If universities are to be truly valued, they must be properly funded

Our public universities need to be treasured. That means a rethink on how they are managed and funded.

Universities are trying to find new ways to combat cheating in exams.
Education

Universities grapple with new ways to test students to combat cheating

About eight per cent of students admitted to taking an exam for someone else and 4.2 per cent admitted someone else had done their exam.

  • by Anna Patty
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Universities have been caught in an escalating culture war.
Opinion
Opinion

Making sense of the government's war on arts degrees

Humanities graduates have been forced into an existential reckoning about our relative uselessness in a national crisis.

  • by Julie Szego
Kate Blundy.
Exclusive
Private schools

Cate was expelled in year 2. Her parents took the school to court

First Cate was suspended, then banned from the school bus.

  • by Jordan Baker
Staff have been doing gender bias training to prepare to open former Marist Brothers High to girls
Private schools

Dance, netball and gender bias training: How a boys' school prepares for girls

The newly co-ed Marist Catholic College in North Sydney is putting staff and boys through gender bias training.

  • by Jordan Baker
Universities face a tumultuous few years
Coronavirus pandemic

'Tumultuous': The seismic change hidden in Tehan's plans for unis

If the government's changes pass, students will pay a greater proportion of the domestic teaching bill than the Commonwealth for the first time in decades.

  • by Jordan Baker
Dan Tehan has proposed significant changes to fees for university courses.
University

Readers debate government's changes to university fees

'The overhaul of university funding is really significant ... I think the comments speak to how passionate people are about Australia's education system.'

  • by Aimie Rigas
A UTS spokesperson said it was the first major outage in 20 years.
Education

Two thousand UTS students have online exams interrupted due to outage

Eighteen exams scheduled across two sessions were interrupted when the university's Blackboard platform experienced a major outage.

  • by Natassia Chrysanthos
Students protest against proposed university fee changes
ANU

Lack of higher education vision will 'kill' universities, says vice-chancellor

Universities say the federal government needs to act quickly on research, as important, long-term projects may be cut because they can no longer afford them.

  • by Jordan Baker and Fergus Hunter
Big changes are afoot at universities.
Opinion
Opinion

Cultural cringe + market economics = lower education

The government wants to turn universities into factories turning out future workers, but can we trust it to know where the jobs will be? And while we're at it, do we settle for importing our culture?

  • by Thomas Keneally
Former students could pay off their debts soon if they could use superannuation to do it.
Opinion
Opinion

University fee changes prepare us for post-COVID opportunities

If we are to carve our own future, we will need to pivot to new market opportunities as the reliance on our resources shifts in the new energy order.

  • by Katie Allen
Boarding school students across the state can return from Tuesday.
Education

Camden High School the second to close this week due to COVID-19 case

Camden High School is the second Sydney school to close over COVID-19 cases in two days, after Lane Cove West Public School was closed on Thursday.

  • by Natassia Chrysanthos
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Students look at books outside the ‘iHub’’ at Arthur Phillip High School in Parramatta.
Education

Cutting school electives 'an entry point' to decluttering curriculum

The government has vowed to cut 20 per cent of high school electives, but some subjects to be slashed have not been studied for years or have just a handful of enrolments.

  • by Natassia Chrysanthos
Lane Cove West Public School is closed today.
Health

Authorities expect more COVID cases in Sydney after positive test of student

The death of a Bankstown man has been reclassified as a COVID-19 death, bringing the Australian toll to 104.

  • by Kate Aubusson and Lisa Visentin
Education Minister Dan Tehan says the sustainability of research funding needs to be addressed.
Exclusive
Research

Tehan to convene vice-chancellor group to replace broken research funding system

The Education Minister will bring together the high-powered group to overhaul a model that has relied on subsidisation from students.

  • by Fergus Hunter and Jordan Baker
The playground at Lane Cove West Primary School.
Education

Year 2 Sydney student tests positive to COVID-19, school closed

A note on Lane Cove West Public School's website on Wednesday night said the school was "temporarily non-operational".

  • by Jamie Berry
Public school students were 2.5 times more likely than Catholic or independent school students to be without internet access at home during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Life in Lockdown

Public school students 2.5 times more likely to be without home internet

Five per cent of public school students would have been without home internet access during the pandemic, compared to 2 per cent of Catholic and independent school students.

  • by Natassia Chrysanthos
Paul Ramsay's bequest means the centre he established is one of the few places pumping money into the humanities.
Opinion
Steve Jobs

'Not quite what we expected': Ramsay Centre now a lifeboat for humanities going under

Our message has never been more relevant: we devalue and defund the arts at our peril.

  • by Simon Haines
Moriah College in Sydney's east.
Private schools

Financial controller of Moriah College spent stolen millions on poker machines, court told

Augustine Robert Nosti agreed in court on Tuesday that he misappropriated $7 million from the school. He said 'the majority' was used for gambling on poker machines.

  • by Georgina Mitchell
Abraham Lincoln once said: “The philosophy of the schoolroom in one generation will be the philosophy of government in the next.”
Opinion
Opinion

The attack on the humanities will harm future generations

Disciplines such as social science, culture, philosophy, politics and economics were irrelevant to the builders of communism, and now it seems they are superfluous to the builders of the digital post-modernity.

  • by Lena Redman
Education Minister Dan Tehan has called on concerned students to consider that the new system is fairer.
Coronavirus pandemic

Tehan tells concerned school leavers that uni fee shake-up is fair

The university fee overhaul has triggered concerns for school students who have picked subjects based on degrees they have committed to.

  • by Fergus Hunter and Jordan Baker
Peter FitzSimons graduated with an arts degree and is proud of it.
Opinion
University Of Sydney

I am eternally grateful for my humble arts degree

The Morrison government does down the contribution of arts grads at its peril.

  • by Peter FitzSimons
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Big changes are afoot at universities.
University of New South Wales

'Perverse incentive' for universities to use humanities as cash cows

The federal government's push to train more scientists and engineers will actually lead some universities to instead enrol more high-fee paying humanities students, a leading vice-chancellor says.

  • by Jordan Baker
Rock art conservationists in 1985 outside Bull Cave nestled in a patch of bushland near Campbelltown,
Opinion
Sydney

A special Sydney place reminds us that history matters

Even on a cave wall in Sydney's west, history is contested, yet the government is telling students it's not as important as more 'job-ready' pursuits.

  • by Anna Clark
Former students could pay off their debts soon if they could use superannuation to do it.
Opinion
Dominic Perrottet

Unlock super to pay off student debt

Students, debt holders and government coffers alike will benefit.

  • by Lyndon Gannon
Minister for Education Dan Tehan.
Letters
Opinion

Uni fee overhaul connotes shallow view of education

Our universities need to produce a skilled workforce but not at the expense of new ideas, informed debate and cultural enrichment.

A new HSC hub has been created to help year 12 through their COVID-hit exams
Teaching

Practice exams, tutorials on new online HSC hub

Extra HSC resources will be given to year 12 to help them overcome the disruption of COVID-19.

  • by Jordan Baker
Minister for Indigenous Australians Ken Wyatt during Question Time at Parliament House in Canberra.
Ken Wyatt

Wyatt eyes deal on schools to lift Indigenous Australians out of disadvantage

The federal government is close to a deal with the states to lift classroom performance by acting on shocking attrition rates that have seen young children leave school years too early.

  • by David Crowe
A closer look at the numbers may suggest an unhappier equation for STEM students.
Opinion
STEM

It doesn't add up: uni funding overhaul will also hurt STEM students

A new fee structure will hit arts students, but the overall proportion of federal funding for universities will decline and it will also hurt science, technology, engineering and mathematics students - the ones it is supposedly designed to help.

  • by Gareth Bryant
An internal NSW Department of Education report recommends public schools adopt the IB.
Exclusive
Schools

Public schools should offer International Baccalaureate, says report

But education leaders say the HSC makes available just as much flexibility and opportunity for critical thinking.

  • by Jordan Baker
Some humanities subjects do well in the new funding structure.
Opinion
Opinion

Why we need humanities graduates in our workforce

The study of, say, Australia’s history or that of our foes and allies and the politics and cultures of India and China is vital to our future.

  • by Joy Damousi
Aboriginal warriors in action in a sketch titled "A Deadly Encounter" by H Calvert in 1870.
Indigenous

How Indigenous history is taught in NSW schools

Insufficient teacher knowledge and discomfort about confronting content can mean students graduate with gaps in their knowledge.

  • by Natassia Chrysanthos
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A child washes his hands before entering primary school.
Opinion
Opinion

Back to the human business of face-to-face schooling

Video conferencing platforms do a fair job of approximating aspects of these relationships. But none are as natural or powerful as being in a classroom.

  • by Guido Piotti
Viveca Tang is a year 12 student at Pymble Ladies College, and she is worried about the fee hike for law degrees, which puts her university plan in flux.
Exclusive
University

Uni fee hikes another blow for class of 2020

For the students graduating in 2020, the news follows the stressors of a summer of bushfires; COVID-19 lockdowns; and a reframing of the future.

  • by Jordan Baker
Big changes are afoot at universities.
Opinion
Opinion

Don’t rob Peter to pay for Paul on uni places

The government is right to tackle the jobs crisis with increased university funding for courses that have strong job prospects, but it is wrong to target humanities.

  • by The Herald's View
China has issued a warning for students travelling to Australia.
Opinion
Dan Tehan

Proposed overhaul of university fees nothing short of radical

Liberal arts graduates are taught to question power and democracy. It's tempting to see this move as a step towards cultivating compliant, "quiet Australians" instead.

  • by Tim Soutphommasane